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Remnant Rome Report

Remnant Rome Report (3)

The Remnent Newspaper traveled to Rome for coverage of the Conclave.

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Tradition Remembered

Tradition Remembered (3)

The Remnant Will Never Forget



The Remnant devotes this section of our exclusively to testimonies by those who lived through the revolution of the Second Vatican Council.

This page is reserved for those who saw what happened, or heard what happened from those who did,  and who truly understand how Catholic families were blown apart. Visitors who have personal reflections, or memories of traditionalists pioneers, or reminicences of the revolution are encouraged to tell their stories and share their pictures here. . . so that we will never forget.


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Vatican Sex Abuse Summit in Rome

Vatican Sex Abuse Summit in Rome (0)

RTV Covers Vatican Sex Abuse Summit in Rome

Remnant TV was in Rome this past week covering the Vatican’s clerical sexual abuse summit on the “protection of minors”. It seemed a dismal assignment, to be sure, but the reason it was necessary for The Remnant to be in the Eternal City was so we could throw in with our traditional Catholic allies in Rome who’d organized an act of formal resistance to the Vatican sham summit.

Going in, we all knew that the ultimate goal of the summit was to establish child abuse—not rampant homosexuality in the priesthood—as the main cause of a crisis in the Catholic Church which now rivals that of the Protestant Revolt. (Remnant TV coverage of this event as well as the Vatican summit itself, can be found on The Remnant’s YouTube channel, and for your convenience is laid out below:

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Remnant Cartoons

Remnant Cartoons (89)

Have you subscribed to The Remnant’s print edition yet? We come out every two weeks, and each issue includes the very latest Remnant Cartoon!

SUBSCRIBE : https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today

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As reports flood in concerning the letter of the four (now three, with the passing of Cardinal Meisner, RIP) “Dubia Cardinals” requesting an audience with Pope Francis—a letter which, like the Dubia themselves, has evidently been studiously ignored for a considerable while, before being made public faute de mieux—events regarding the Diocese of Ahiara in Africa have been distinctly back-burnered. 

For a moment there, we North Americans watched with a great deal of fascination and much less information as the Holy Father once again wielded his signature weapon of demanding the submission of letters reflecting content he controls, immediately and pending outcomes that could charitably be characterized as draconian.  To reiterate, the priests in this diocese have not accepted a bishop appointed by Francis, ostensibly because of tribal tensions, although the priests themselves have contested this portrayal of their motives.  But whatever the nature of the conflict itself, the facts which have emerged regarding the way the Holy Father has elected to approach the matter remain both disturbing and undenied. [Note: In response to the situation in Ahiara, which he described as “an attempted taking over of the vineyard of the Lord,” Pope Francis asked “every priest or ecclesiastic incardinated in the Diocese of Ahiara, whether he resides there or works elsewhere, even abroad, write a letter addressed to me in which he asks for forgiveness; all must write individually and personally. We all must share this common sorrow.” Whoever fails to do so within thirty days, the Pope said, “will be ipso facto suspended a divinis and will lose his current office.” MJM]

Certain conservative commentators, uncomfortably critical of Amoris Laetitia and arguably eager to seize upon opportunities to sound supportive of this Holy Father whenever they can be, have commended Pope Francis for acting “decisively” in Ahiara (which is putting it mildly), as is his right.  The refusal to accept a bishop is, in fact, a very serious matter regardless of the reasons behind it, compromising the unity of the Body of Christ.  Still, in this as in any case, the reality that some kind of intervention is warranted doesn’t automatically mean that every kind of intervention is justified.  Praising the way the African situation has been dealt with so far is like contending (as the old saying goes) that any liquid will help put out a fire, including—say—gasoline.

In truth, every Catholic ought to be not only quietly concerned, but even overtly alarmed, by the way this Supreme Pontiff is abusing the office he holds in a pattern that is both escalating and impossible to responsibly ignore.  Yes, discipline should sometimes be administered, but never apart from justice.  Yes, higher authority is to be recognized, but so is the dignity of the inferior.  Yes, action must be taken by the Pope (and by all of us) for the good of the Church, but the personal agenda of any of its members, including that of the servus servorum Dei, may not be slyly substituted for this “good,” nor are the rest of us required to turn a blind eye when such an attempt is made.  Pope Francis’ treatment of the clergy in Africa, like his trampling of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate, the Knights of Malta, the John Paul II Institute—and the list keeps getting longer—has not been an exercise of authority but of authoritarianism unhinged.  Those who have lately proffered their applause would do well to recall what appeasement in the face of such tactics has historically been demonstrated to accomplish.

First of all, the threat of suspending the entire African diocese a divinis is egregious.  When an appraiser decides on the value of a property, for example, he looks around at other similar homes in the neighborhood and finds out what they sold for, so that he can determine a price range that might be fair.   When we consider the Mexican Standoff in Africa and ask, “How have comparable situations been dealt with?” we find ourselves—like Reepicheep the Narnian mouse in the clutches of the slave traders—reduced to virtual silence by the number of things that need to be said all at the same time.  Can you imagine Pope Francis issuing the same kind of ultimatum to, say, Cardinal Marx and what’s left of his diocese instead?  Cardinal Kasper?  The hierarchy of the troubled island of Malta? 

Neither can I.

And neither (more to the point) can they.

Looking at the African situation in context, in other words, makes the suspension threat very difficult to support.  If Pope Francis was simply a tough-guy overall, but an evenhanded one, our evaluation could be different.  “Cowboy up; this is how he treats everybody, and we’ll all be better off because of it in the end,” would be one thing.  “Why is he going after these people now, when the ones who really deserve it are still being left alone?” is quite another.   When Jorge Bergoglio personally barges into the office of Father James Martin, S.J., demanding a signature within the hour of a prewritten missive in which Father agrees to pull his Bridges bestseller straight off of the shelves and repent for having harmed the unity of the Body of Christ or lose his good standing as a Catholic priest, I’ll be impressed by the treatment meted out to the clergy in Ahiara—but not before.

Secondly, the emphasis on making the African priests apologize to the Holy Father himself, personally and all but exclusively, is deeply problematic.  Let’s say an adolescent too young for a driver’s license steals his father’s car keys, and obtains and consumes an excessive amount of alcohol while cruising around town.  He predictably loses control of the vehicle, knocking down a teenager who was biking on the sidewalk, and then careens across the park and into the playground, hospitalizing three toddlers before dead-ending into a tree.  What kind of a father would, upon being made aware of the situation, seek out his son, shake him by the shoulders, and shout, “You apologize to me this instant, young man!  This instant; do you hear?  And if you think for one moment you’re going to get away without paying for the damage to the Mercedes, you’ve got another thing coming.  Do you realize what you’ve done to the rest of the family that has to drive it—like, for example, me?   Well, do you?” 

The father in this scenario is well within his rights to count himself as first among to whom his son owes an apology.  Still, he is far from the only one.  It would say something distressing about the man’s personal perspective and priorities if being apologized to constituted, at this stage in the game, his sole or even his main concern.   Yet that is precisely how Pope Francis is behaving. 

What about demanding that the African clergy apologize to the rejected bishop, if mere tribal affiliation is truly the basis for the painful ostracization?  How about requiring those priests to say they’re sorry to the members of their flocks, traumatized and possibly even scandalized by the spectacle taking place before their very eyes?  And would it be asking too much for the Holy Father to take into account even the welfare of the allegedly recalcitrant clerics themselves?  The father whose son went out and wrecked the car would hopefully want to know not only how the teenager and the toddlers are doing, but also that the boy himself is still safe and sound, which are separate concerns entirely from justified condemnation of the child’s clear guilt.   Pope Francis’ entire modus operandi, from his passive-aggressive refusal to so much as acknowledge the existence of concerns which are not his own to the now-legendary meltdowns constituting the flipside of the same coin, indicate clearly that there exists only one person whom he truly wishes to shield from being offended or even harmed.  And I will give you a hint:  that person, according to him, is no one else on earth, and no one in Heaven, either.

But wait—weren’t we treated to another trademark Scriptural garbling contesting this very characterization?  Yes, the Holy Father did invoke the parable of the workers in the Vineyard as his motive for acting as he has in Ahiara, lending the papal high dudgeon a truly holy tinge.  Pope Francis’ point, if not that of the inspired author, comes down to this:  he gets to suspend whomever he wants to suspend, whenever he wants to suspend them, because (as he cordially pointed out to Cardinal Müller on the occasion of having dismissed some clerical personnel from the CDF without cause), he is the Pope!  Which is why, truth to tell, the “caring for the Vineyard” thing ended up ringing a bit hollow at best.

Guarding and advancing the good of the Bride of Christ is to be accomplished selflessly, primarily, entirely, and without prejudice, not only by members of the hierarchy but by all of the baptized, according to their own stations and measures.   This means that a man who becomes our Holy Father incurs greater accountability, not less.  The bishop and clergy of a given diocese have a certain portion of the Church entrusted to their care, but the Pope has the whole thing.  If Francis the First was actually the fearless guardian of the Vineyard which he styles himself, he would be observed behaving personally and officially according to the same standard he is imposing upon his Ahiara underlings, and then some.  But is he?

A Supreme Pontiff like the one Pope Francis is implicitly claiming to be would—to pull a wild example out of nowhere—answer crucial questions put to him about encroachments upon the Church’s timeless Eucharistic discipline in a prompt and forthright fashion (not to mention, correctly).  Such a Pope would, at the very least, give first place in his calendar to any Cardinals requesting an audience intended to address their grave reservations in this regard.  Are we seeing any such thing?   No, we are not.  And it is a safe bet that we will see Father Martin turn in his required letter of apology for his “gay-friendly” apologetics first.

That is why the Bergoglian “L’eglise, c’est moi!” must not to be given any quarter in our hearts, minds, theological reflections, or public comments—the perceived need to be supportive of this particular occupant of the See of Peter whenever possible notwithstanding.  If once Pope Francis is allowed to establish the principle (or, in any case, the credible impression) not that he himself, just like everybody else, has to obey Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, so that Our Lord may be obeyed in truth by all through ordered membership in the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church which He established, but rather that submitting to Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is crudely and unqualifiedly the same thing as submitting to Pope Francis personally, and to whatever Christian or unChristian thing he chooses to say or do, then there is no question where this pontificate will end up taking us.  Anyone who fails to recognize this reality will not be able to use the exercise of “charity,” or of “finding the good in everything,” or of seeking a “balance between right and left” as their shield in the end, either, because any remaining ignorance about the shell game Jorge Bergoglio is playing is far, far from invincible at this stage.  All roads lead to Amoris; how far are we going to allow ourselves to led us down this garden path?

After all, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize that we Catholics are being desensitized in either direction.  When Pope Francis does something illegitimate—like, say, trying to allow for the admission of unrepentant public adulterers to Holy Communion—he does it with elaborately legitimate orchestration.  After all, before the promulgation of the objectionable Apostolic Exhortation, surveys were distributed throughout the entire world, endless interviews were granted, and not one but two Family Synods were eventually hosted.  That way, any Catholic critical of the absolutely unacceptable end Team Bergoglio was trying to achieve could be neutralized by citing the complete ecclesial correctness of the means that were so painstakingly employed in achieving it.  But when Pope Francis does something legitimate—like, say, trying to get the Diocese of Ahiara to recognize a bishop authoritatively appointed—he does it in maximally illegitimate ways.  Any Catholic critical of his capricious cruelty towards these particular clerics just has to eat it, because it is the right of the Church hierarchy to retain control over the appointment of its own bishops (just like this same Holy Father has been so careful to do in China—right?).  We are gradually being bludgeoned into accepting the idea that being the Pope means, on the one hand, that Francis the First gets to do whatever he wants to and, on the other, that he can do it any way he pleases.  Is this really a progression which deserves even the most restrained conservative applause?

What Papa Bergoglio means by the peculiar warping of the concept of Catholic “total obedience” he continues to invoke ever more shamelessly on his own behalf, in other words, and what well-formed but not-entirely-clued-in Catholic commentators naturally assume he means, may be two very different things.  Does anyone doubt that the day may not be far away on which letters of assent to Amoris Laetitia and its rank heterodoxies will be demanded from any and all—and on pain, no less, of every sanction that the very highest office of the Church has at its command?  And what will there be left to say in support of The One Who Must At All Costs Be Supported, when it dawns?

Lefebvre Ordination 1977 b

Ever since the New Year we’ve been quietly celebrating The Remnant’s 50th anniversary in these columns with a wide variety of vintage Remnant articles that appeared over the years since my late father founded The Remnant in 1967. Over 1,100 issues of The Remnant have gone to press during the turbulent half-century since the close of Vatican II, and I’m proud of the effort our team has made to chronicle the advance of the Modernist Revolution on the one hand, and the ensuing Traditional Catholic Counterrevolution on the other.

freaks

A few writers and pundits have begun to notice it, but even their comments cannot encompass or fully express what has happened intellectually to our society, to our present-day politics, and to our culture. At least one third, perhaps many more, of the citizens of our nation apparently live in a parallel universe, with its own set of foundational beliefs, its own standards of truth and narrative of facts. This universe in almost every respect represents the aggressive contrary, the negation, of the inherited, rooted principles on which our historic Western and Christian civilization is based. This “other” reality, this paradigm, did not all of a sudden just spring up or just appear, it has been cultivated and nurtured for centuries. Its creating philosophers understood that their operational premises and desired objectives ran up full force against the ingrained traditions and historic legacy of a culture and civilization that traced its origins not only to the beliefs of the ancient Hebrews, but also to the highest art and philosophy and statecraft of the Greeks and of Rome.

Breitbart is helping to spread the latest Trump tweet: 

President Donald J. Trump has backed the fight to save the critically ill British baby Charlie Gard, saying he would be “delighted” to “help” the boy after a European court ruled his parents could not privately fund a final attempt to treat him.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has been slammed for acting like a “death panel” after denying Charlie’s parents the chance to take their son to the U.S. for “experimental treatment”.

The court argued that little Charlie was too ill, could not be saved, and must “die with dignity” in the UK.

His mother disagreed, insisting, “Charlie should get a chance to try these medications”, explaining: “He literally has nothing to lose but potentially a healthier, happier life to gain.”

The President waded in on the debate on Monday, tweeting: “If we can help little #CharlieGard, as per our friends in the U.K. and the Pope, we would be delighted to do so.”

Read the Rest HERE


REMANANT COMMENT: So remind me again: Why does it make absolutely no difference to pro-life America (and to the unborn) that Trump won the last election?  Because I'm still a bit unclear on that.

Baby CharlieBaby Charlie Gard


When the European Court of Human Rights (George Orwell, call your office) denied the parents of little Charlie Gard the opportunity to take their 10-month-old from Great Britain to the United States in their last-ditch effort to save their child’s life, Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia had some interesting things to say.  Paglia, of course, is he of ‘homoerotic painted-selfie’ fame, and bears the shiny new Papa Francesco mint mark as the head not only of the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family, but also of the Pontifical Academy for Life (recently repopulated with activists and scholars who are anything but).  Paglia seems kind of busy to take on the leadership of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith as well, but who else is the Holy Father going to get, who reflects his views so transparently and carries out his wishes so faithfully?

Saturday, July 1, 2017

The Baby and The Archbishop

Written by

good videoNote: In this article, Father Gleize addresses the question of Church unity, which he shows to be (first and foremost) a unity of Faith, and only afterwards a unity of government. He concludes that a conception of Church unity which would exclude unity of Faith, or put it in second place, would be a legalistic unity, contrary to the very nature of the Church, and more apparent than real. Father Gleize ranks the ecumenical unity dreamed of by Paul VI and John Paul II, and the unity of “full communion” dangled by Rome before the SSPX as such. He concludes that the Vatican's new Profession of Faith cannot form the basis of unity of Faith in the Church, and that, while the preaching and government of the Hierarchy may be deficient at a given point in time, unity of Faith subsists throughout history because it is based on the unchanging Truth taught by the Magisterium.(This article appeared in LE COURRIER DE ROME, May 2017, and can be found in the original French here: http://laportelatine.org/publications/presse/courrier_de_rome/2017/1705cdr599.pdf The subtitles are by the translator, who asks for prayers for himself and his family).

The Church: 'the Mystical Body of Christ'.

(CNA/EWTN News):

On Wednesday Pope Francis said that following Christ means taking a path contrary to that of the world, and being prepared to suffer because of this; though we have hope because of God’s constant presence.

“Persecution is not a contradiction to the gospel, but is part of it: if they persecuted our Master, how can we hope that we will be spared the struggle?” he said June 28.

“However, in the midst of the whirlwind, the Christian must not lose hope, thinking he has been abandoned. Jesus reassures his disciples saying, ‘Even the hairs of your head are all counted.’ As much as to say that none of the sufferings of man, even the most minute and hidden, are invisible to the eyes of God.”

“God sees, and surely protects; and will give his ransom.”

Pope Francis continued his catechesis on the theme of Christian hope during the weekly general audience Wednesday in St. Peter’s Square. This time he reflected on the counter-cultural life of the Christian, which will mean withstanding persecution on some level, and for some, even martyrdom.   “Christians are therefore men and women ‘against the current,’” he said. “It is normal: since the world is marked by sin, manifested in various forms of egoism and injustice, those who follow Christ walk in the opposite direction.” READ ARTICLE HERE

REMNANT COMMENT: What in the world has Pope Francis taught that would in any way lead to persecution? No "proselytism”, no dogma, no rigidity, "who am I to judge?", divorce is ok, ecological virtues, etc.  The man sucks up to the modern West at every opportunity to the point there is nothing to be persecuted over. It's called human respect. And eventually it's going to run out. 

Is Pope Francis finally beginning to sense that there might be a shelf life for Greg Burke's awesomely-humble pope shtick?

 

New from RTV...

Sunday Sermons of South St. Paul

Father places the suffering of Christ--God and Man--into perspective. How is it possible for God to suffer?

This sermon on the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is as beautiful as it is instructive.

What do Catholics believe?  What to you believe about the Sacred Heart of Jesus?

481522 reasons to stop looking at your phone
"Appearances often come to us second or third hand, filtered through ever proliferating communications media, so that the so-called real world recedes farther from us every day."   - Solange Hertz

Editor's Note: The following first appeared in The Remnant on February 28, 2002.   In the fast-paced world of blogging and tweeting and texting, this article is entirely too long, too boring, too hard to read, too demanding, too challenging, and definitely too whatever to be taken seriously.  But I'm confident a few holdout dinosaurs still ambling about the real world will appreciate its unconventional and politically incorrect message. It was written by an excellent thinker, a saintly academic, and something of a prophet. She didn't blog, never sent a single tweet, and, while her face was usually in a book, Facebook meant nothing to her.   And yet even despite such crippling handicaps, she had something to say.  She also had the kind of courage rarely seen here in this brave new world of ours---the courage to be different and to question the modern world's most sacred narratives (what she called “fairytales for adults”) about who we are and what we're doing here on this earth.  I’m confident there are still readers out there who’ve been insufficiently brainwashed to read and appreciate the words and wisdom of the late, great Solange Hertz. Especially if you're younger than 35, I dare you to give it a try -- and let the blindfold be damned. MJM 

Sooner or later, anyone found actually trying to apply the maxims of the Gospels to daily life can expect to be told to “get real!”  as if living a spiritual life involved entering a largely imaginary world that  existed mostly in the mind. Parents of home schoolers, for instance, are sometimes asked, or even ask themselves, “What will happen to these children educated outside the mainstream according to Catholic principles, when they leave home and plunge into the real world? 

Monday, June 26, 2017

The Real World Featured

By:
This just in from our friends at LifeSite – The new U.S. delegation to the United Nations has rejected a resolution on violence against women because it called for abortion to continue in countries where it's legal. 

Canada introduced the resolution, which was adopted by consensus.

The U.S. said they supported it in "spirit," but not its call for "comprehensive sexual and health-care services" and "safe abortion where such services are permitted by national law." 

"We do not recognize abortion as a method of family planning, nor do we support abortion in our reproductive health assistance," said U.S. First Secretary to the U.N. in Geneva Jason Mack. The U.S. "must dissociate from the consensus," he said as reported by Reuters.  READ THE REST HERE


REMNANT COMMENT:  As the LSN story further points out, in April, the Trump administration pulled funding from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) over its cooperation with China's forced abortion regime. President Trump also reinstated the Mexico City Policy preventing U.S. taxdollars from funding abortion and the promotion of abortion overseas. And Trump picked the former governor of South Carolina, pro-life Nikki Haley, to serve as U.S. ambassador to the U.N.

So remind me again: Why does it make absolutely no difference to pro-life America (and to the unborn) that Trump won the last election?  Because I'm still a bit unclear on that.